Make room for chatbots at your firm, LawDroid founder says

Make room for chatbots at your firm, LawDroid founder says

By Angela Morris (ABA Journal)

Chatbots have a place in a law office, says legal chatbot creator Tom Martin, because they can handle busy work that eats up precious time in a lawyer’s day.

Martin is the founder of LawDroid, a company that creates legal chatbot apps that mimic human conversations when talking with potential clients.

For example, a reception bot on a firm’s website can answer questions about the lawyers who work there and the services they provide, and it can schedule clients for consultations, Martin explains. By wiping out such mundane tasks, it frees up time for meaningful human interactions between lawyer and client that no machine can master.

Click here to read the rest of the story and listen to the podcast.

Could 80 percent of cases be resolved through online dispute resolution?

Could 80 percent of cases be resolved through online dispute resolution?

Perhaps in five to seven years, as Colin Rule sees it, half of U.S. citizens who file court cases will have access to online dispute resolution software walking them step by step through their matters, resolving up to 80 percent of cases. Rule, a nonlawyer mediator, is vice president for online dispute resolution at Tyler Technologies. In this episode of the ABA Journal’s Legal Rebels Podcast, Rule speaks with Angela Morris about the possibilities–and pitfalls–for this technology. Listen to the podcast here.
Brace Yourselves, PACER-Like Systems Are Coming This Winter

Brace Yourselves, PACER-Like Systems Are Coming This Winter

By the end of the year, the Lone Star State will have a PACER-like court records system.

The Texas Supreme Court took the next step in expanding re:SearchTX, which grants access to state court records electronically filed anywhere in Texas, so that lawyers can download documents in any case—and so can the general public—at a cost of 10 cents per page up to a $6 maximum per document.

The system has operated since February 2017 with limited access for judges, court clerks and attorneys of record to access documents in their own cases. This new order opens access further to attorneys—they’ll be able to access any case, not just their own—and other registered users who provide personal information like their name, address, phone number and more.

Published on Texas Lawyer on Oct. 4, 2018.
https://www.law.com/texaslawyer/2018/10/04/brace-yourselves-pacer-like-systems-are-coming-this-winter/

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Michele Mirto: Stepping up A2J while cutting cost

As executive director of Step Up to Justice, a Tucson, Arizona-based privately funded legal aid nonprofit, Michele Mirto wields a shoestring budget and just three staff members armed with legal technology. They lead an army of volunteer lawyers in resolving low-income clients’ civil matters—mostly family law but also guardianship, consumer law, bankruptcy, and wills and probate.

Link.

PDF: michele_mirto_a2j_cutting_cost

Legal services innovator moves on to app development

It’s too easy for attorneys to be aware that something isn’t perfect in their practices and accept the situation instead of pushing back. So says longtime legal innovator Nicole Bradick. “What it’s all about is identifying something not working as well as it should be and thinking of possible solutions,” says Bradick, who in January launched a legal technology company, Theory and Principle, that aims to do just that: “Ask why is this happening, and are there any changes we can make to fix the problem?”

Link to podcast.

BigLaw firms are working together to influence how blockchain technology will operate in the future

The cryptocurrency and blockchain technology industry is already crowded with firms eager to nab high-tech startups as clients or help legacy clients navigate a brave new world.

But some BigLaw firms have gone further. Over the past 2½ years, several of the largest firms in the world have joined legal working groups aimed at bringing crypto and blockchain attorneys together to share information, learn from one another, and help craft best practices.

Link.

PDF: biglaw_cryptocurrency_blockchain_smart_contracts

Associate Departs Big Law to Create Pro Se Online Startup

Associate Departs Big Law to Create Pro Se Online Startup

Although she spent the first six years of her career in Big Law, California attorney Dorna Moini always knew that her true passion was in human rights and access to justice.

After graduating from the University of Southern California Gould School of Law in 2012, Moini, who has dual citizenship in the United States and Iran, worked at Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton and then at Sidley Austin.

But Big Law practice wasn’t her calling. Her experiences gained from frequent travel between the United States and Iran, plus a fellowship as an undergraduate helping draft legislation to outlaw slavery in northwest Africa, and her pro bono work as a Big Law associate provided a window into the stark divide in access to justice here and abroad. And she was driven to do something about it.

Link.

PDF: Associate Departs Big Law to Create Pro Se Online Startup _ Law