Golf Course Called Police on Black Lawyer Who Knows Her Way Around Civil Rights Law

One of the African-American women on a golf course, whose co-owner said they were playing too slowly and called the police, is a Pennsylvania lawyer and president of the local NAACP chapter.

Sandra Thompson and her friends were golfing on April 21 at Grandview Golf Club in Dover Township, where they are members, when the co-owner of the golf course alerted police about their pace of play and asked them to leave. The women denied they were golfing too slowly, and they stayed put.

Like the recent incident at a Philadelphia Starbucks where an employee called police about two black men who did not immediately place an order while waiting on a friend, the golfers’ fiasco has spread quickly among national media like The Associated Press, Newsweek and ESPN, and was even featured on Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show” in a segment about people calling police on others “for being black in public.”

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PDF:Golf course called police on lawyer

150 Women Lawyers Plan Brigade to Oklahoma Capitol Over Teacher Pay

A group of 150 women attorneys is set to descend upon the Oklahoma State Capitol on April 9 to help negotiate a deal between lawmakers and teachers over school-funding woes.

Teacher walkouts across the state since April 2 have ground schools to a halt, prompting Tulsa lawyer Becki Murphy to organize the group, made up mostly of women lawyers with children. The effort has received support from men attorneys as well, she said.

“It puts heat on this legislature to get something done,” said Murphy, whose practice focuses on family law.

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PDF: 150 Women Lawyers Plan Brigade to Oklahoma Capitol Over Teacher Pay _ Law.com

Penthouse in Peril for Cleary Gottlieb Lawyer

Lawyer Barry Fox of New York could be in danger of losing his penthouse apartment after an appellate court ruled he isn’t entitled to rent-stabilization protections.

Fox, senior counsel with Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton, who lived in the Upper East Side building since 1975, never knew his former landlord was getting tax benefits for his apartment being rent-stabilized. He was paying market rent—$25,000 per month—and it wasn’t until 2014, when his building changed hands and a new landlord said it wasn’t going to renew his lease, that he learned he might have protections against eviction.

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PDF: Penthouse in Peril for Cleary Gottlieb Lawyer _ New York Law Journal

New Nonprofit Firm the First Founded by Baby Lawyers

Two recent law graduates in Houston have joined a national trend by launching a new nonprofit law firm to serve low- and middle-income clients.

Access Justice Houston, founded by 2017 University of Houston Law Center graduates MacKenzie Dunham and Doug Evans, has become the fourth Texas-based nonprofit firm—along with DiFilippo Holistic Law Center in Austin, Legal Access Texas in Dallas, and Greater Waco Legal Services in Waco—that are targeting modest-means clients in an effort to close the justice gap. The other Texas-based nonprofit firms were launched by veteran lawyers; Dunham and Evans are the first recent law graduates to take the plunge.

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PDF: New Nonprofit Firm the First Founded by Baby Lawyers _ Texas Lawyer

Voting Begins for Next President-Elect of the State Bar of Texas

Lawyers begin voting today to decide whether Lisa Blue or Randy Sorrels will become the next president-elect of the State Bar of Texas.

Lawyers have 30 days to cast their ballots, and the winner of election will serve as president-elect for one year, starting this summer, and then become state bar president in June 2019.

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PDF: Voting Begins for Next President-Elect of the State Bar of Texas _ Texas Lawyer

At Elite Law Reviews, Diversity Efforts May Be Paying Off

In the past few years, some of the country’s most elite law reviews have elected students of color as editors-in-chief, a signal that yearslong diversity efforts might finally be paying off.

Historically speaking, law reviews have struggled to represent students of color and women equally among their editors—jobs that can open doors to prestigious judicial clerkships and Big Law employment. It’s been even harder for underrepresented students to win the coveted editor-in-chief role, as statistically, leadership posts at law reviews have overrepresented white male law students.

Are the times changing?

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PDF: At Elite Law Reviews, Diversity Efforts May Be Paying Off _ National Law Journal

Move Over Moms, Male Lawyers Are Using Flextime Too

Say the word “flextime” and most people think of reduced hours for working mothers. But a small, yet growing number of male lawyers are using lighter job schedules to strike the right work-life balance.

More law firms in recent years have incorporated flextime policies—especially reduced-hour schedules—to help with attorney retention. And women, more than men, have used the policies to balance their jobs with raising kids.

But more widespread adoption by male attorneys of the benefit is expected to lift all boats—helping women lawyers juggle demands and attracting millennial attorneys less interested in working a constant grind.

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PDF: Move Over Moms, Male Lawyers Are Using Flextime Too _ Law.com